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Category Archives: User Experience

User Testing & Design: 6 Quantitative Insights Into Yelp

User Testing & Design: Quantitative Analysis of Yelp's Website

Our last post talked about our qualitative analysis of the user tests on Yelp’s website. We found 7 key insights, such as learning that the Events tab wasn’t very helpful and that the filters could use improvement.

In this post, we’ll take a closer look at quantitative analysis on the Yelp site by discussing the insights from card sorting and click testing. To test the Yelp site, we ran a closed card sort and click test.

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How to turn Sketch mockups into animated interactive prototypes

Turning Sketch files into animated interactive prototypes

You’re deep in Sketch working on your design and now want to take it to the interactive stage. But you want to do it quickly, without code, while preserving all of your layers. Your team also needs to be able to comment directly on the prototype. Sounds tough, right? It’s actually quite easy. 

We’ll show you how simple it can be to turn your Sketch files into a fully interactive prototype with a simple drag & drop. Within UXPin, your team can also comment directly on the design. 

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New Live Presentation tool in UXPin

Live Preview Feature in UXPin

Combining design preview, cursor tracking, and voice calling, Live Presentation lets you give stakeholders the perfect design presentation.  

In this post, we’ll give you a quick summary and tutorial so you can see how easy it is. 

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UXPin now integrates with Photoshop and Sketch

UXPin Photoshop & Sketch Integration

We’re excited to announce that UXPin can now adapt even better to your existing workflow. Starting today, you can import your files directly from Photoshop and Sketch into UXPin. All layers and elements are preserved.  

We’ll give you a quick summary and tutorial so you can see how easy it is. 

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Testing & Redesigning Yelp: User Research (from upcoming e-book)

Test & Redesigning Yelp: User Research

In our second sneak peek, we summarized the process of breaking down Yelp’s business model and deciding the right types of user tests.

Now, let’s take a look at the actual user research. To get qualitative feedback on the Yelp site, we chose remote unmoderated testing since it allows for simultaneous testing. For quantitative data on the Yelp site, we chose closed card sorting and click testing to show us how users prioritize content. We also gathered quantitative data on the Yelp support site by conducting a tree test and open card sort to show gaps in the information architecture. 

The entire process of user testing and redesign along with screenshots of the new Yelp site will all be included in our upcoming e-book. Below, you can get an overview of the user research process. 

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Testing & Redesigning Yelp: Product Definition (from upcoming e-book)

Testing & Redesigning Yelp

In our first sneak peek, we summarized the entire UX process of redesigning Yelp with our partners UserTesting and Optimal Workshop. Now we’ll give you an overview of how we ensured the redesign was driven by business insights. 

The entire process of user testing and redesign along with screenshots of the new Yelp site will all be included in our upcoming e-book, but we’ll provide you a glimpse of UX design in action.

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New Usability Testing Kit ready to download (free!)

Usability Testing Kit

Good design is based on user needs. And in order to know what they need, you need to conduct user testing. But don’t worry, we’ll help you out. 

Our CEO Marcin Treder created a free usability testing kit based on his 7 years of experience as a designer and user researcher. He’s distilled hundreds of hours of user testing experience into one simple-to-use kit. 

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Data & Content Innovation: 5 Design Patterns for Mobile UI

Data & Content Innovation

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Designing the user interface of a mobile application is tricky due to the large amount of data and content you are trying to fit onto a relatively small screen. One of the best ways of addressing this issue is by incorporating the right design patterns into your mobile system. The most successful mobile application companies, such as Houzz, Instagram, Pinterest, and Wunderlist, have already done the hard work of innovating patterns that make data and content management as simple and intuitive for the user as possible. Rather than innovating from scratch, we may instead leverage these existing design patterns to our competitive advantage.

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UX Design for Mobile Applications: Getting Social

Getting Social

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Aristotle once said that “Without friends, no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.” Similarly, mobile apps can have a lot of cool features, but without incorporating a social aspect into them, they may not be the best they can be. Which is not to say that all apps require social features – apps such as your bank account app or Google Maps probably don’t need social utilities at all. But for many mobile apps, the social aspect can be very advantageous, because people strive for human connection. By integrating social features into your mobile UI design, you not only facilitate human relationship, but also drive more traffic to your app.

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Navigating the Mobile Application: 5 UX Design Patterns

Navigating the Mobile Application

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Perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind when designing a mobile application is to make sure it is both useful and intuitive. If the app is not useful, it has no additional value and no one has any reason to use it. If it is useful yet entails a steep learning curve, people won’t bother learning how to use it. Good UI design addresses both of these design problems, and as discussed in Successful Mobile Applications: Using UI Design Patterns, the formalized best practices for solving common design problems are known as design patterns. Understanding and recognizing today’s newest and most trending design patterns can give you a huge leg-up in the industry of mobile application design, so that your next app will be fresh and competitive.

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