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Building Stronger UX Prototypes With the Interactions Menu

Illustration of the interactions panel in, well, action.

The appropriately-named interaction picker lets designers create ways for users to work with elements on a view. With this tool you can make elements react to users’ actions, like taps and hovers, and then change the interface accordingly. Text links, for example, can take people to new pages. Hovering over elements can present tooltips. And tapping search icons can present entire forms. Better yet, you can apply interactions to anything including form fields, text blocks and whole groups of elements.

Invisible elements, though, are only selectable from the Layers menu. That’s both a handy way to select items underneath other items … unless you want to work with them directly.

In this tutorial we’ll explore ways to select elements and add interactions. If you aren’t yet using UXPin, you can start a free trial and follow along.

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Exporting Prototypes to HTML or PDF Couldn’t Be Easier

Illustration of files (down)loading onto a truck.

Iterating through design doesn’t stop with prototypes. Many people find the ability to share PNGs, PDFs and HTML/CSS handy to have. Such versions are great for archiving drafts, printing out for whiteboard discussions, or testing in real browsers on mobile devices.

In this tutorial we’ll explain how to quickly export a prototype. If you want to follow along, get a free trial to UXPin.

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3 Quick Ways to Build Great Prototypes in the UXPin Editor

Illustration of the UXPin editor

The UXPin editor comes with many features that help you communicate your ideas to clients, developers, and other designers. Here’s how you can start using the UXPin editor to make prototypes in a snap.

Before we dive in and if you want to follow along, you can get UXPin with a free account

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Simplifying UX Design Through Storytelling

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Visualizing data comes up more and more in my work as a UX Designer. Data can be visually striking, but it needs a language and story to follow in order to be effective.

Over the years, the art of storytelling has become the structure I use as the foundation of my designs. Every good story has a hero who is on some sort of quest. And like every quest, there’s always a monster that must be slayed. Describe your user and the problem, then craft a story that helps everyone better understand the journey.

I’ll explain a process I followed on a recent project that will help you with your own UX design project. Feel free to follow along in UXPin

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Previewing the Awwwards 2016 Web Design Conference

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Designers from all over the world are gathering in Amsterdam this winter for three days of talks, workshops, and networking, all culminating in a massive cocktail party in one of the city’s historic church venues.

Awwwards has been a partner of ours for years, and their conference is one of our favorites in web design. Let’s explore what they have in store this year. 

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Fighting for UX Design in the Enterprise

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Working as a UX designer in the enterprise world can be challenging, but the experience can also be fun and rewarding. If you enjoy solving complex problems and function well in an environment with well-defined boundaries, enterprise UX could be right up your alley.

Having worked on a design team in a large corporation for the past four years, I’ll share tips and observations for more successful design amidst the politics and complex workflows.

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Creating Multistate Elements in UXPin

Multistate element symbol

Have you ever wished to create complex sliders, tabs or large menus? Have you already spent long hours adding interactions to create such complicated elements?

The pain has just ended! By means of Multistate elements you can achieve such effect easily in UXPin. If you’re not using UXPin yet, you can sign up for a free trial.  With that, let’s get started. 

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4 UXPin Updates That Improve Your Workflow

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Working on a product, like UXPin, is opening yourself up to an ongoing conversation with your users. Over time, you get to learn more about your users and how they’re using the product. And you also learn what’s bugging them (pun fully intended).

We learn a lot from users, receiving emails from them that something in the app isn’t quite working like they thought. We listen to them and work to make things right. Because those little annoyances can add up and it’s the little things that matter the most.

So with that, let’s take a look at the most recent updates that’ll make your life easier while using UXPin. And if you’re not yet using UXPin, give it a try with a free trial.

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Creating Perfect User Flows for Smooth UX

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If someone asked you to define the word “flow” or describe an example of one, what would you say? Would you immediately think about flow as it relates to user experience or interaction design? Maybe… but, maybe not.

In this post, I’ll describe how to create smooth user flows based on my experience as a UX designer. 

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Free ebook: Web Design Trends 2015 & 2016

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Our free digital library welcomes its newest addition: Web Design Trends 2015-2016. The guide explains the 10 hottest web design trends. Plenty of visual examples included.

Let’s take a look inside.

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